Meghan Lamb

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Failure to Thrive (Apocalypse Party, 2021)

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"Meghan Lamb's debut novel is a marvel. It's an indelible portrait of a nearly forgotten place, full of stunted lives and desperate hopes, decaying homes and fading memories, ghostly presences brought vividly to life. It’s a timely exploration of the failures that seep into our lives like slow leaks and the systems that intensify them. It’s a haunted landscape made luminous by Lamb’s exquisite prose." —Jeff Jackson

All of Your Most Private Places (Spork Press, 2020)

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"In All of Your Most Private Places, Meghan Lamb has written a new kind of fiction, and to read it is a new kind of experience. From the very first page of the very first story, everything–characters, objects, landscapes–begins to glow, flickering alluringly until it is all fully vivid, like a mirage that is at the same time real. Sometimes it feels as if they are in some way superimposed on each other, character and setting, for instance, and then they separate, languidly, solidly themselves. A captivating, mystical book." -Amina Cain

Silk Flowers (Birds of Lace, 2017)

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"Silk Flowers is incisive, intimate, ethereal yet physical, capturing the disconnect between lovers, a disconnect that appears to travel deep into each one of them and then manifest in mysterious, unbidden ways. Sharply written, structured in an almost unsettling his/hers dichotomy, this is a novel that will make the reader ponder the distances between and within." -Dao Strom

Letter to Theresa (Dancing Girl Press, 2016)

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When I was 11, a friend showed me / some stupid magazine story / which analyzed your personality / based on your lipstick shape.

Sacramento (Solar Luxuriance, 2014)

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"In Meghan Lamb's novella, the reader confronts free-will across time and space, as multiple narratives of hopeful despair encounter the wall that is love, the wall that is desire, the precipice that can be either definite or impossible. With direct prose reminiscent of the early works of Anna Kavan, characters are forced to confront the distance between reality and subjectivity. In the distance of both narratives echoes the name of a city in California: Sacramento. Neither a locatable destination nor a state capitol, but rather a spot on an imaginary map that unites grief with sovereignty."

Love, Jennifer Jason Leigh (Self Published, 2011)

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"A series of surprisingly touching correspondences between Meghan Lamb's "Jennifer Jason Leigh" character and a craigslist poster, then between JJL and a spambot mail-order bride. Originally created as a zine to hand out at the January 2012 P Fanatics reading."